Roberta on the Arts
The Park Avenue Chamber Symphony and Jessica Lee Present Beethoven and Brahms
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The Park Avenue Chamber Symphony and Jessica Lee Present Beethoven and Brahms

- Classical and Cultural Connections


The Park Avenue Chamber Symphony
www.chambersymphony.com

Beethoven and Brahms
Featuring Jessica Lee, Violin

David Bernard, Music Director and Conductor
Jessica Lee, Violin
(Jessica Lee Bio)

Andrea Berger, Administrative Director

At
Alice Tully Hall
Lincoln Center
www.lincolncenter.org


Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower
October 24, 2006


(See January 28, 2006 David Bernard Conducting The Park Avenue Chamber Symphony).

Program:

Beethoven (1770-1827): Overture to Fidelio, Op. 72b

Beethoven: Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61
Allegro ma non troppo
Larghetto
Rondo, Allegro

Jessica Lee, Violin

Brahms (1833-1896): Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 68
Un poco sostenuto-Allegro
Andante sostenuto
Un poco allegretto e grazioso
Adagio-Più andante-Allegro non troppo, ma con brio



The Park Avenue Chamber Symphony was founded in 1999, and its mission is philanthropic, as its musicians, drawn from high level worlds of business, government, architecture, law, education, and medicine, target these events to raise funds for not-for-profit organizations, such as Juilliard and Lincoln Center Institute for the Arts in Education. These professional-level musicians have been trained at Juilliard, The Eastman School of Music, The Curtis Institute, and other renowned music schools. David Bernard has conducted in twenty countries in symphonic repertoire, musical theater, and opera, and his performances have been broadcast on WQXR and WNYC. Maestro Bernard is also a professional keyboard soloist. (PACS Notes).

The Park Avenue Chamber Symphony performed Beethoven and Brahms tonight, with solo violinist, Jessica Lee, performing in Beethoven’s Violin Concerto in D major. Ms. Lee, Korean-American, has performed in four continents, including at Carnegie Hall’s Weill Hall, Philips Collection in DC, and the Caramoor Festival. She has participated in an artist institute at Ravinia and performed with American Chamber Orchestra. The evening began with Beethoven’s (1814) Overture to Fidelio, brisk, clean, and intense. The textures were refined, and this operatic introduction included varying moods and motifs.

When Ms. Lee took the stage, an elegantly presented young virtuoso, in a ruffled grey gown, she took Tully Hall by storm, as the Allegro ma non troppo forcefully flew in, with breezy, windy violin passages. Propulsive, but controlled, Ms. Lee was confident and poised. The racing violin solos were indicative of extensive and dedicated training. Maestro Bernard kept the orchestra focused and full-sounding. The Larghetto showcased Ms. Lee’s sophisticated style and timing, and the elongated notes were played poignantly and mournfully. The Rondo, Allegro was magnetic, and the audience gave Ms. Lee and Maestro Bernard a standing ovation.

For the Brahms Symphony No. 1, the orchestra was most dynamic and dramatic, as the gorgeous melodies swept seamlessly, movement to movement. This majestic work is a delight on each hearing, and Maestro Bernard's interpretation added depth, to an already textured masterpiece. Ironically, Brahms had premiered this symphony in a small city “where the fallout could be contained in the event the symphony was poorly received” (Program Notes). Un poco sostenuto-Allegro was driven and pounding, with a sweeping musical landscape and repetitious brass. The strings echoed in ethereal preparation for the slower, Andante Sostenuto, with its quiet, breath-like moments. Un poco allegretto e grazioso and the finale, Adagio-Più andante-Allegro non troppo, ma con brio, brought in flutes and oboes, all of which were tender and lilting. Bassoons and trumpets took a resonant theme, followed by flutes and quivering strings. The con brio was just that, with smiles all around, especially on the faces of these very professional musicians, all of whom play this music as a passion, in addition to busy days in education, architecture, government, business, law, and medicine.

Kudos to Maestro David Bernard, Ms. Jessica Lee, and The Park Avenue Chamber Symphony for a magnificent performance of masterworks by Beethoven and Brahms.



Jessica Lee, Solo Violinist, and David Bernard, Music Director,
The Park Avenue Chamber Symphony
Photo courtesy of Jessica Lee



David Bernard and The Park Avenue Chamber Symphony
Photo courtesy of Steve J. Sherman



David Bernard and The Park Avenue Chamber Symphony
Photo courtesy of Steve J. Sherman



David Bernard and The Park Avenue Chamber Symphony
Photo courtesy of Steve J. Sherman




For more information, contact Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower at zlokower@bestweb.net