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Cristiana Pegoraro: From Waltz to Tango and Beyond
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Cristiana Pegoraro: From Waltz to Tango and Beyond

- Classical and Cultural Connections

Cristiana Pegoraro:
From Waltz to Tango and Beyond
www.CristianaPegoraro.com

At
Alice Tully Hall
Lincoln Center
(Lincoln Center Website)

THE PERMANENT MISSION OF ITALY TO THE UN
THE CONSULATE GENERAL OF ITALY IN NEW YORK
and
THE ITALIAN CULTURAL INSTITUTE IN NEW YORK
present

CRISTIANA PEGORARO, pianist

PROGRAM

“FROM WALTZ TO TANGO AND BEYOND”
in collaboration with the Permanent Missions of Argentina, Austria, Hungary, and Poland to the United Nations


F. Schubert/F. Liszt: Soirée de Vienne: Valse-Caprice No.6

F. Chopin: Mazurka Op.68 No.2 and Mazurka Op.33 No.2

A. E. Chabrier: Scherzo-Valse

J. Brahms: Waltzes Op.39 No.1, 2, 11, 15, 14

E. Granados: Danza Española: Oriental

G. Rossini/F. Liszt: La Danza - Tarantella Napoletana

********

Pegoraro: Dance with Me (world premiere)

A. Piazzolla/C. Pegoraro: Four Tangos: Chau Paris, La Muerte del Angel, Oblivion, Made in USA

E. Nazareth: Polkas: Ameno Resedá - A Fonte do Suspiro

E. Lecuona/C. Pegoraro: Fantasy on Cuban Dances


Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower
November 14, 2004

Cristiana Pegoraro is a striking and talented woman, who performed tonight to a near sold-out Tully Hall, quite an accomplishment for any solo pianist, and certainly for one who plays tangos by Piazzolla, not so well known by the general music audience. Ms. Pegoraro has received numerous awards in Italy, New York, and Prague. She has performed in great concert halls and, last year, played for the President of Italy and the President of the General Assembly of the United Nations. She is renowned for her interpretations of South American and Cuban music. Ms. Pegoraro donated a portion of the concert’s proceeds to Unicef.

The Schubert/Liszt Valse-Caprice was an excellent opening work with some lullaby-like passages and some ballet-like passages, perhaps a dreamy dance. The spinning segments reminded me of a tiny glass ballerina in a music box, and romantic intonations followed. The first Mazurka was exotic, like a belly dance with veils and undulating hips. The second Mazurka was pure dynamism with beautiful, blended rhythms. Chabrier’s Scherzo-Valse, with its rapid staccato effects, indicated tremendous keyboard mastery, as it ended with surprising simplicity.

Brahms’ five Waltzes had the quality of a full string orchestra, with sophistication and soaring sound. A bravura bounce completed this imaginary dance. Ms. Pegoraro, in the Granados Danza Española, evoked an ethereal introduction and then created mystery and magnetism, finally looking off into the distance as her notes floated off, perhaps to sea. The Rossini-Liszt Tarantella was hardly a Tarantella score for ballet with flowers and ruffles and tambourines. This Tarantella had a dark, foreboding, dramatic mood, all whirling dervish and magic.

For the first half of the Program, Ms. Pegoraro was dressed in a fetching, long black gown, and for the second half, she changed into an equally stunning orange gown, and the visual and auditory effect, as she often left the stage between works, was quite effective. Ms. Pegoraro’s Premiere, Dance with Me, resembled an intimate dialogue, between a man and a woman at sea. It was brief, entrancing, and elegant. Ms. Pegoraro’s Piazzolla interpretations were well known (to this writer, a Tanguera). She exuded flair and warmth in Chau Paris, passion and angst in La Muerte del Angel, melancholy and loss in Oblivión, and pleasure and lightness in Made in USA.

The Polkas were performed with lightning speed, too rapid for actual dancing, but perfect for captivating Polka rhythm and fancy. Ms. Pegoraro slid her nimble hands along her keyboard with pulsating purpose. The Lecuona work, with a hint of Mambo, seemed to be dance fantasy with inherent Latin rhythms and scintillating sultriness. Libertango, the encore, grabs the soul, as Piazzolla’s ultimate Tango, the film score of The Tango Lesson. Kudos to Cristiana Pegoraro for a sensational, solo piano performance.



Cristiana Pegoraro Signs Autographs




For more information, contact Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower at zlokower@bestweb.net