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New York City Ballet: The Sleeping Beauty 2013
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New York City Ballet: The Sleeping Beauty 2013

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New York City Ballet
(New York City Ballet Website)

The Sleeping Beauty 2013

Founders, George Balanchine and Lincoln Kirstein
Founding Choreographers: George Balanchine and Jerome Robbins
Ballet Master in Chief, Peter Martins
Ballet Mistress, Rosemary Dunleavy
Children’s Ballet Master, Dena Abergel
Orchestra, Interim Music Director, Andrews Sill
Managing Dir. Communications & Special Projects, Robert Daniels
Manager, Media Relations, Katharina Plumb
Assoc., Communications &Special Projects, Caitlin Gillette
The David H. Koch Theater, Lincoln Center
www.lincolncenter.org



Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower
February 21, 2013


(Read More NYC Ballet Reviews).

The Sleeping Beauty (Ballet in Two Acts, 1991): Music by Peter Ilyitch Tschaikovsky, Libretto by Marius Petipa and A. Vsevolozhsky, after stories by Charles Perrault and others, Choreography by Peter Martins (after Marius Petipa) (Garland Dance by George Balanchine), Scenery by David Mitchell, Costumes designed by Patricia Zipprodt, Costumes executed by Barbara Matera, Make-up, Hair, and Wigs designed by Michael Avedon, Lighting by Mark Stanley.

Sleeping Beauty was premiered at Maryinsky Theater, St. Petersburg, January 15, 1890. George Balanchine made his ballet debut in Sleeping Beauty, as a dancer in the Garland Waltz and as a cupid. For NYC Ballet’s 1981 Tschaikovsky Festival, George Balanchine choreographed the Garland Dance. Peter Martins included this Garland Dance in his 1991 staging. This production includes more than 100 dancers, including students from School of American Ballet, and 250 costumes. David Mitchell’s scenes create a mystical world and fairy tales. Patricia Zipprodt’s costumes follow paintings of the courts of Louis XIV and Louis XV. (NYCB Notes).

February 14, 2013 (Conductor: Clotilde Otranto)
Cast:

Performed by: Ashley Bouder as Princess Aurora; Andrew Veyette as Prince Désiré; Justin Peck as King Florestan; Marika Anderson as The Queen; Janie Taylor as The Lilac Fairy; Arch Higgins as Catalabutte; Jenifer Ringer as The Fairy Carabosse; Megan LeCrone as The Fairy of Tenderness; Lauren King as the Fairy of Vivacity; Lydia Wellington as The Fairy of Generosity; Brittany Pollack as The Fairy of Eloquence; Gwyneth Muller as The Fairy of Courage; Adrian Danchig-Waring, Ask la Cour, Zachary Catazaro, and Taylor Stanley as The Suitors; Georgina Pazcoguin as The Countess; Allen Peiffer as His Attendant; Jared Angle, Savannah Lowery, Erica Pereira, and Alina Dronova as The Jewels; Kristen Segin and Devin Alberda as The White Cat and Puss in Boots; Lauren Lovette and Daniel Ulbricht as Princess Florine and The Bluebird; Isabella Vanik and Daniel Applebaum as Little Red Riding Hood and The Wolf; Antonio Carmena, Austin Laurent, and Giovanni Villalobos as The Court Jesters; the Company as The Cavaliers, The Lilac Fairy’s Attendants, The Court, The Maids of Honor, The Garland Dance Villagers, The Hunting Party, The Nymphs, and The Courtiers, and students from School of American Ballet.

February 20, 2013 (Conductor: Clotilde Otranto)
Cast:

Performed by: Ana Sophia Scheller as Princess Aurora; Gonzalo Garcia as Prince Désiré; Justin Peck as King Florestan; Marika Anderson as The Queen; Savannah Lowery as The Lilac Fairy; Arch Higgins as Catalabutte; Jenifer Ringer as The Fairy Carabosse; Megan LeCrone as The Fairy of Tenderness; Lauren King as the Fairy of Vivacity; Lydia Wellington as The Fairy of Generosity; Kristen Segin as The Fairy of Eloquence; Gwyneth Muller as The Fairy of Courage; Adrian Danchig-Waring, Ask la Cour, Zachary Catazaro, and Taylor Stanley as The Suitors; Georgina Pazcoguin as The Countess; Allen Peiffer as His Attendant; Jared Angle, Rebecca Krohn, Erica Pereira, and Sara Adams as The Jewels; Sarah Villwock as The White Cat and Puss in Boots; Brittany Pollack and Troy Schumacher as Princess Florine and The Bluebird; Charlotte Sandford and Andrew Scordato as Little Red Riding Hood and The Wolf; Austin Laurent, Daniel Ulbricht, and Giovanni Villalobos as The Court Jesters; the Company as The Cavaliers, The Lilac Fairy’s Attendants, The Court, The Maids of Honor, The Garland Dance Villagers, The Hunting Party, The Nymphs, and The Courtiers, and students from School of American Ballet.

February 21, 2013 (Conductor: Andrews Sill)
Cast:

Performed by: Sterling Hyltin as Princess Aurora; Robert Fairchild as Prince Désiré; Joshua Thew as King Florestan; Gwyneth Muller as The Queen; Teresa Reichlen as The Lilac Fairy; Christian Tworzyanski as Catalabutte; Marika Anderson as The Fairy Carabosse; Gretchen Smith as The Fairy of Tenderness; Mary Elizabeth Sell as the Fairy of Vivacity; Ashley Laracey as The Fairy of Generosity; Alina Dronova as The Fairy of Eloquence; Georgina Pazcoguin as The Fairy of Courage; Jared Angle, Jonathan Stafford, Zachary Catazaro, and Amar Ramasar as The Suitors; Faye Arthurs as The Countess; Austin Laurent as His Attendant; Adrian Danchig-Waring, Megan LeCrone, Lauren Lovette, and Sara Adams as The Jewels; Kristen Segin and Devin Alberda as The White Cat and Puss in Boots; Lauren King and Harrison Ball as Princess Florine and The Bluebird; Claire Abraham and Daniel Applebaum as Little Red Riding Hood and The Wolf; Ralph Ippolito, Allen Peiffer, and Daniel Ulbricht as The Court Jesters; the Company as The Cavaliers, The Lilac Fairy’s Attendants, The Court, The Maids of Honor, The Garland Dance Villagers, The Hunting Party, The Nymphs, and The Courtiers, and students from School of American Ballet.

Only an inveterate balletomane would attend three performances in a week of the full-length The Sleeping Beauty, even taking into consideration the fact that Peter Martins’ version is somewhat synthesized, with two instead of three Acts. The set is sumptuous, as the traditional story unfolds, with a castle on high, that seems to shift and change with the time of day (constellations appear and evolve at night). Seasons are marked (autumn is depicted with blazing golds and oranges), and the inevitable brambles that enclose the sleeping Kingdom appear. David Mitchell’s fantasy-styled sets, Zipprodt and Matera's elegant tapestry and flowing and frothy costumes, and Avedon's wigs and hair are all uniquely theatrical. Clotilde Otranto conducted on both February 14 and 20, while Andrews Sill conducted on the 21st. Without doubt, Maestro Otranto led the Orchestra with the dramatic flair and filmatic technique that made the story flow with added fascination.

Ashley Bouder and Andrew Veyette were Princess Aurora and Prince Désiré on the 14th, while Ana Sophia Scheller and Gonzalo Garcia took the roles on the 20th, and Sterling Hyltin and Robert Fairchild took the roles on the 21st. Each lead duo was daring in the Wedding scene, with breathtaking and rapturous lifts and leaps, but Ms. Hyltin and Mr. Fairchild were especially soulful and spellbinding. Ms. Hyltin glowed in the Vision scene, as her Prince was introduced to her by the Lilac Fairy. Her Rose Adagio faltered twice, while the other two Auroras were fully balanced, but Ms. Hyltin’s presentation was less streamlined, more sensual. Mr. Fairchild could command a Broadway stage, just as much as he commands the stage in this ballet, for he has gallant virtuosity and dynamic charisma. He partnered Ms. Hyltin with adoration and care, always placing her front and center. His spins and dashes, to and fro, especially in the Vision and Wedding, were compelling.

Ms. Scheller was cool and sophisticated, more mature and womanly, with her technique and steps mastered. She accomplished her Rose Adagio en pointe with determination, but she did not reveal her inner persona as did Ms. Hyltin. Mr. Garcia, filled with dazzle and etherealness, as well as tighter muscular strength, seemed self-contained and sometimes detached. Ms. Bouder, on the 14th, was too plucky and purposeful for this sensitive role. She would have been an exciting Fairy Carabosse. Mr. Veyette was a dashing Prince, and he filled the Vision scene with daring and dizzying dervish. He also succeeded in superb partnering in the Wedding scene, but there was not much chemistry there with Ms. Bouder. It was more acting, less attachment.

Of the three Lilac Fairies, Janie Taylor on the 14th, Savannah Lowery on the 20th, and Teresa Reichlen on the 21st, all resplendent, Ms. Taylor was silky, Ms. Lowery was embracing, and Ms. Reichlen was sparkling. Each danced with a different level of command, and each was convincing in her rescue of Aurora, as an infant and at sixteen, in response to the curse from Fairy Carabosse. The latter Fairy, danced by Jenifer Ringer on the 14th and 20th, and by Marika Anderson on the 21st, is a critical role to the ballet’s theatrics. Ms. Ringer was wild and devilish, using every dramatic nuance she could muster. She seemed to delight in this role. Catalabutte is another key character, the King’s assistant, who forgets to include Carabosse at the Christening. On the 14th and 20th, former Principal, Arch Higgins, was a Guest Artist, and he was perfect, blundering and bungling against the wrath of King Florestan. On the 14th and 20th, Justin Peck and Marika Anderson were most convincing as King Florestan and the Queen.

Of the featured Fairies, who dance at the Christening and Wedding, Georgina Pazcoguin, on the 21st, was a superb Fairy of Courage, Brittany Pollack, on the 14th, was outstanding as the Fairy of Eloquence, Lauren King, on the 14th and 20th, was exceptional as the Fairy of Vivacity, Gretchen Smith, on the 21st, was memorable as the Fairy of Tenderness, and Lydia Wellington, on the 14th and 20th, was the finest Fairy of Generosity. In the scene, called “The Spell”, when Aurora dances her Rose Adagio with the four Suitors, before Carabosse arrives disguised and sneaks a spindle to the birthday celebrant, the Suitors on the 14th and 20th, Adrain Danchig-Waring, Ask la Cour, Zachary Catazaro, and Taylor Stanley, were most absorbing. At “The Wedding”, Lauren King and Harrison Ball were the surprise Princess Florine and The Bluebird, on the 21st, drawing gasps and bravos. Mr. Ball is a rising young star in the Corps, with pronounced propulsion. Kristen Segin and Devin Alberda, on the 14th and 21st, danced the White Cat and Puss in Boots with detailed comedy.

Mr. Martins has added a dance of four Jewels to the Wedding, and Adrian Danchig-Waring was eye-catching as Gold, while Lauren Lovette was resplendent as Ruby, both on the 21st. Sara Adams shone as Emerald on the 20th and 21st, and Rebecca Krohn sparkled as Diamond on the 20th. Although Mr. Martins’ choreography for this Beauty is synthesized, with scenes shortened to fit this story ballet that’s almost a half-hour less than other versions, it includes a ravishing Wedding scene, with unique dances by Little Red Riding Hood and The Wolf and The White Cat and Puss in Boots, plus the four Jewels. The pas de deux for Aurora and Prince Désiré is also extra spontaneous with added flourishes in Aurora’s lunges into her Prince’s arms.

Kudos to Peter Martins for this fine rendition of a favorite ballet.



Ashley Bouder and Andrew Veyette
in Martins' "The Sleeping Beauty"
Courtesy of Paul Kolnik



Ana Sophia Scheller and Gonzalo Garcia
in Martins' "The Sleeping Beauty"
Courtesy of Paul Kolnik



Sterling Hyltin and Robert Fairchild
in Martins' "The Sleeping Beauty"
Courtesy of Paul Kolnik



For more information, contact Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower at zlokower@bestweb.net