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The Joe Pino Quintet at Somethin' Jazz Club on the East Side
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The Joe Pino Quintet at Somethin' Jazz Club on the East Side

- Jazz and Cabaret Corner

The Joe Pino Quintet
www.joepinojazz.com

With:
Joe Pino on Trumpet and Flugelhorn
Kyle Moffatt on-alto sax
Max Marshall on piano
Nathan Brown on bass
Takashi Inoue on drums

At
Somethin’ Jazz
www.somethinjazz.com/ny

212 E. 52nd Street
(btw. 2nd & 3rd Ave.)
New York, NY 10022
212.371.7657

Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower
November 24, 2013


I discovered Somethin’ Jazz Club next to Fabio Cucina Italiana on East 52nd Street, after dinner, and the place was hopping. Satoru Steve Kobayashi, Proprietor, helps serve drinks and greets the guests. He has a second club in Tokyo, same name. Somethin’ Jazz has several sets each night, so guests could actually linger for a full concert. Tonight’s 9:00 set featured the Joe Pino Quintet, a vibrant ensemble of seasoned musicians. Max Marshall’s piano was bouncing and effervescent, as I arrived early in the set, and Nathan Brown was featured in a bluesy solo. Kyle Moffat, on alto sax, infused sharp rhythms, but it was Joe Pino, on trumpet, who first caught my eye. He has a smooth mastery of the instrument, and, although he had a couple of new performers in tonight’s quintet, Pino had pulled them together for tight chemistry and an ear for cues. The set was engaging.

The first piece was heavy in Takashi Inoue’s smart percussion, in combination with the bass, and a slow steady swing beat on Pino’s flugelhorn ensued. Piano riffs added texture and fascination in their intriguing improvisation. Next was a tropical piece, and Joe went wild on his trumpet. Piano chords lifted the sound, as alto sax and trumpet enveloped the mood with a south of the border tune. The music was progressive and original. Inoue’s drums brought in the clavé beat. After intermission, Joe led the next work with a nice, lyrical bounce. It had a dance club beat, as well. Urgent refrains followed the plaintive introduction, with speedy and energized fervor. Following this lyrical tune, Pino, on flugelhorn, and Moffatt, on alto sax, presented a warm melody that merged Marshall’s piano riff with their brass. Clavé percussion and bass led the cool melody, before the piano grabbed the moment and developed a magnetic riff. A bass solo followed Pino’s effervescent flugelhorn, and gentle piano keys and brushes finished the piece. The final tune of this set was a vivacious swing, with Moffatt’s alto sax in an early lead. Pino, now on trumpet, waited to come in. Each musician had a healthy turn in the spotlight tonight, and the audience loved it all.



The Joe Pino Quintet
at Somethin' Jazz Club NYC
Courtesy of Roberta Zlokower



The Joe Pino Quintet
at Somethin' Jazz Club NYC
Courtesy of Roberta Zlokower



The Joe Pino Quintet
at Somethin' Jazz Club NYC
Courtesy of Roberta Zlokower



The Joe Pino Quintet
at Somethin' Jazz Club NYC
Courtesy of Roberta Zlokower




For more information, contact Dr. Roberta E. Zlokower at zlokower@bestweb.net